New paper: Exploring Sound-Motion Similarity in Musical Experience

New paper in Journal of New Music Research:nnmr_a_1184689_f0001_b

Exploring Sound-Motion Similarity in Musical Experience (fulltext)
Godøy, Rolf Inge; Song, Min-Ho; Nymoen, Kristian; Haugen, Mari Romarheim & Jensenius, Alexander Refsum

Abstract: People tend to perceive many and also salient similarities between musical sound and body motion in musical experience, as can be seen in countless situations of music performance or listening to music, and as has been documented by a number of studies in the past couple of decades. The so-called motor theory of perception has claimed that these similarity relationships are deeply rooted in human cognitive faculties, and that people perceive and make sense of what they hear by mentally simulating the body motion thought to be involved in the making of sound. In this paper, we survey some basic theories of sound-motion similarity in music, and in particular the motor theory perspective. We also present findings regarding sound-motion similarity in musical performance, in dance, in so-called sound-tracing (the spontaneous body motions people produce in tandem with musical sound), and in sonification, all in view of providing a broad basis for understanding sound-motion similarity in music.

Citation
Godøy, Rolf Inge; Song, Min-Ho; Nymoen, Kristian; Haugen, Mari Romarheim & Jensenius, Alexander Refsum (2016). Exploring Sound-Motion Similarity in Musical Experience. Journal of New Music Research.  ISSN 0929-8215. . doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09298215.2016.1184689

BibTeX

@article{godoy:2016,
author = {Rolf Inge Godøy and Minho Song and Kristian Nymoen and Mari Romarheim Haugen and Alexander Refsum Jensenius},
title = {Exploring Sound-Motion Similarity in Musical Experience},
journal = {Journal of New Music Research},
volume = {0},
number = {0},
pages = {1-13},
year = {0},
doi = {10.1080/09298215.2016.1184689},
URL = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09298215.2016.1184689},
eprint = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09298215.2016.1184689},
abstract = { People tend to perceive many and also salient similarities between musical sound and body motion in musical experience, as can be seen in countless situations of music performance or listening to music, and as has been documented by a number of studies in the past couple of decades. The so-called motor theory of perception has claimed that these similarity relationships are deeply rooted in human cognitive faculties, and that people perceive and make sense of what they hear by mentally simulating the body motion thought to be involved in the making of sound. In this paper, we survey some basic theories of sound-motion similarity in music, and in particular the motor theory perspective. We also present findings regarding sound-motion similarity in musical performance, in dance, in so-called sound-tracing (the spontaneous body motions people produce in tandem with musical sound), and in sonification, all in view of providing a broad basis for understanding sound-motion similarity in music. }
}

Published by

alexarje

Alexander Refsum Jensenius is a music researcher and research musician living in Oslo, Norway.