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My research on national TV

A couple of weeks ago, NRK, the Norwegian broadcasting company screened a documentary about my research together with the physiotherapists at NTNU in the CIMA project. The short story is that we have developed the tools I first made for the Musical Gestures Toolbox during my PhD, into a system with the ambition of detecting signs of cerebral palsy in infants.

The documentary was made for the science program Schrödingers Katt, and I am very happy that they spent so much time on developing the story, filming and editing. The video can be seen (in 3 parts) on NRK Nett-TV (at least within Norway), and below are a few screenshots.

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ICMC 2006 proceedings details

A colleague of mine recently asked if I could help her find the bibligraphic details of the ICMC 2006 proceedings. Apparently this information is not easily available online, and she had spent a great deal of research time trying to find the information.

I was lucky enough to participate in this wonderful event at Tulane University, and still have the paper version of the proceedings in my office. So here is the relevant information, in case anyone else also wonders about these details:

  • Editors (Paper chairs): Georg Essl and Ichiro  Fujinaga
  • November 6-11 2006
  • Publisher: International Computer Music Association, San Francisco, CA & The Music Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA
  • ISBN: 0-9713192-4-3

 

 

New publication: “To Gesture or Not” (NIME 2014)

This week I am participating at the NIME conference, organised at Goldsmiths, University of London. I am doing some administrative work as chair of the NIME steering committee, and I am also happy to present a paper tomorrow:

Title
To Gesture or Not? An Analysis of Terminology in NIME Proceedings 2001–2013

Links
Paper (PDF)
Presentation (HTML)
Spreadsheet with summary of data (ODS)
OSX shell script used for analysis

Abstract
The term ‘gesture’ has represented a buzzword in the NIME community since the beginning of its conference series. But how often is it actually used, what is it used to describe, and how does its usage here differ from its usage in other fields of study? This paper presents a linguistic analysis of the motion-related terminology used in all of the papers published in the NIME conference proceedings to date (2001– 2013). The results show that ‘gesture’ is in fact used in 62 % of all NIME papers, which is a significantly higher percentage than in other music conferences (ICMC and SMC), and much more frequently than it is used in the HCI and biomechanics communities. The results from a collocation analysis support the claim that ‘gesture’ is used broadly in the NIME community, and indicate that it ranges from the description of concrete human motion and system control to quite metaphorical applications.

Reference
Jensenius, A. R. (2014). To gesture or not? An analysis of terminology in NIME proceedings 2001–2013. In Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression, pages 217–220, London.

BibTeX

@inproceedings{Jensenius:2014c,
    Address = {London},
    Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression},
    Pages = {217--220},
    Title = {To Gesture or Not? {A}n Analysis of Terminology in {NIME} Proceedings 2001--2013},
    Year = {2014}}

New publication: “How still is still? exploring human standstill for artistic applications”

sverm-dumpI am happy to announce a new publication titled How still is still? exploring human standstill for artistic applications (PDF of preprint), published in the International Journal of Arts and Technology. The paper is based on the Sverm project, and was written and accepted two years ago. Sometimes academic publishing takes absurdly long, which this is an example of, but I am happy that the publication is finally out in the wild.

Abstract

We present the results of a series of observation studies of ourselves standing still on the floor for 10 minutes at a time. The aim has been to understand more about our own standstill, and to develop a heightened sensitivity for micromovements and how they can be used in music and dance performance. The quantity of motion, calculated from motion capture data of a head marker, reveals remarkably similar results for each person, and also between persons. The best results were obtained with the feet at the width of the shoulders, locked knees, and eyes open. No correlation was found between different types of mental strategies employed and the quantity of motion of the head marker, but we still believe that different mental strategies have an important subjective and communicative impact. The findings will be used in the development of a stage performance focused on micromovements.

Reference

Jensenius, A. R., Bjerkestrand, K. A. V., and Johnson, V. (2014). How still is still? exploring human standstill for artistic applications. International Journal of Arts and Technology, 7(2/3):207–222.

BibTeX

@article{Jensenius:2014a,
    Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum and Bjerkestrand, Kari Anne Vadstensvik and Johnson, Victoria},
    Journal = {International Journal of Arts and Technology},
    Number = {2/3},
    Pages = {207--222},
    Title = {How Still is still? Exploring Human Standstill for Artistic Applications},
    Volume = {7},
    Year = {2014}}
Screenshot of MultiControl v0.6.2

MultiControl on GitHub

Screenshot of MultiControl v0.6.2

Screenshot of MultiControl v0.6.2

Today I have added MultiControl to my GitHub account. Inititally, I did not intend to release the source code for MultiControl, because it is so old and dirty. The whole patch is based on bpatchers and trying to hide things away in the pre-Max5-days, when presentation view did not exist.

I originally developed the Max patch back in 2004, mainly so that I could distribute a standalone application for my students to use. I have only incrementally updated it to work with newer versions of Max and OSX, but have never really given it a full brush-over.

The reason why I decided to release the code now is because I get so many questions about the program. Even though there are several other good alternatives out there, a lot of people download the application each month, and I get lots of positive feedback from happy users. I also get information about bugs, and occasionally also some feature requests. While I do not really have time to update the patch myself, hopefully someone else might pick it up and improve it.

Happy multicontrolling!

If you did not understand anything about the above, here is a little screencast showcasing some of the functionality of MultiControl: