New paper: MuMYO – Evaluating and Exploring the MYO Armband for Musical Interaction

usertest3Yesterday, I presented my microinteraction paper here at the NIME conference (New Interfaces for Musical Expression), organised at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. Today I am presenting a poster based on a paper written together with two of my colleagues at UiO.

Title
MuMYO – Evaluating and Exploring the MYO Armband for Musical Interaction

Authors
Kristian Nymoen, Mari Romarheim Haugen, Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Abstract
The MYO armband from Thalmic Labs is a complete and wireless motion and muscle sensing platform. This paper evaluates the armband’s sensors and its potential for NIME applications. This is followed by a presentation of the prototype instrument MuMYO. We conclude that, despite some shortcomings, the armband has potential of becoming a new “standard” controller in the NIME community.

Files

BibTeX

@inproceedings{nymoen_mumyo_2015,
    address = {Baton Rouge, LA},
    title = {{MuMYO} - {Evaluating} and {Exploring} the {MYO} {Armband} for {Musical} {Interaction}},
    abstract = {The MYO armband from Thalmic Labs is a complete and wireless motion and muscle sensing platform. This paper evaluates the armband's sensors and its potential for NIME applications. This is followed by a presentation of the prototype instrument MuMYO. We conclude that, despite some shortcomings, the armband has potential of becoming a new ``standard'' controller in the NIME community.},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression},
    author = {Nymoen, Kristian and Haugen, Mari Romarheim and Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
    year = {2015}
}

New publication: Microinteraction in Music/Dance Performance

2012-10-26-dsc_0014b-640This week I am participating at the NIME conference (New Interfaces for Musical Expression), organised at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. I am doing some administrative work as chair of the NIME steering committee, and I was  happy to present a paper yesterday:

Title
Microinteraction in Music/Dance Performance

Abstract
This paper presents the scientific-artistic project Sverm, which has focused on the use of micromotion and microsound in artistic practice. Starting from standing still in silence, the artists involved have developed conceptual and experiential knowledge of microactions, microsounds and the possibilities of microinteracting with light and sound.

Links
Paper (PDF)
Project page

BibTeX

@inproceedings{jensenius_microinteraction_2015,
address = {Baton Rouge, LA},
title = {Microinteraction in {Music}/{Dance} {Performance}},
url = {https://nime2015.lsu.edu/proceedings/178/index.html},
abstract = {Abstract: This paper presents the scientific-artistic project Sverm, which has focused on the use of micromotion and microsound in artistic practice. Starting from standing still in silence, the artists involved have developed conceptual and experiential knowledge of microactions, microsounds and the possibilities of microinteracting with light and sound.},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression},
author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
year = {2015}
}

Simple video editing in Ubuntu

I have been using Ubuntu as my main OS for the past year, but have often relied on my old MacBook for doing various things that I haven’t easily figured out how to do in Linux. One of those things is to trim video files non-destructively. This is quite simple to do in QuickTime, although Apple now forces you to save the file with a QuickTime container (.mov) even though there is still only MPEG-4 compression in the file (h.264).

There are numerous linux video editors available, but most of these offer way too many features and hence the need to re-compress the files. But I have found two solutions that work well.

The first one, ffmpeg, should be obvious, although I hadn’t thought that it could also do trimming. However, I often like GUI software, and I have found that Avidemux can do what I need very easily. Just open a file, add start and stop markers for the section to be trimmed, and click save. As opposed to QuickTime, it also allows for saving directly to MPEG-4 files (.mp4) without recoding the file.

There was only one thing that I had to look up, and that was the need for starting the trim section on a keyframe in the video. This is quite obvious when wanting to avoid re-encoding the file, but unfortunately Avidemux doesn’t help in explaining this but only gives an error message. The trick was to use the >> arrows to jump to the next keyframe, and then the file saved nicely.

New publication: “Moving to the Beat”

image of Timing & Time Perception

I am happy to announce that I have a new publication out, written together with two of my colleagues Anne Danielsen and Mari Romarheim Haugen:

Moving to the Beat: Studying Entrainment to Micro-Rhythmic Changes in Pulse by Motion Capture

Pulse is a fundamental reference for the production and perception of rhythm. In this paper, we study entrainment to changes in the micro-rhythmic design of the basic pulse of the groove in ‘Left & Right’ by D’Angelo. In part 1 of the groove the beats have one specific position; in part 2, on the other hand, the different rhythmic layers specify two simultaneous but alternative beat positions that are approximately 50-80 ms apart. We first anticipate listeners’ perceptual response using the theories of entrainment and dynamic attending as points of departure. We then report on a motion capture experiment aimed at engaging listeners’ motion patterns in response to the two parts of the tune. The results show that when multiple onsets are introduced in part 2, the half note becomes a significant additional level of entrainment and the temporal locations of the perceived beats are drawn towards the added onsets.