Can AI replace humans?

Or, more specifically: can AI replace an artist? That is the question posed in a short documentary that I have contributed to for this year’s Research Days.

We were contacted before summer about trying to create a new song based on the catalogue of the Norwegian artist Ary. The idea was to use machine learning to generate the song. This has turned out to be an exciting project.

I was busy finishing the manuscript for my new book, so I wasn’t much involved in the development part myself. Most of the work has been done by a recent music technology graduate from the University of Oslo, Lars Monstad, gently supervised by my colleague Stefano Fasciani.

The project started with Ary sending us a bunch of her lyrics in text format and dumps from a digital audio workstation. This material was not really machine-readable/listenable, so Lars had to spend a great deal of time manually structuring and annotating it into a symbolic data set that could be used for training. The machine-learning part of the project involved generating lyrics following this approach, using an AI model that can already speak English. The melody was generated using Bachprop, based on a deep recurrent neural network. Then Lars put it all together into a final soundtrack that we played for Ary.

When talking about AI, I always find it important to highlight that humans are important for the final result. Yes, the machine makes something, but not without a lot of human guidance. The song played in the video (and the many other songs we also generated) was “composed” by a computer. However, Lars made many important decisions throughout the project: the initial preparation of the training material, the models used, the methods used, all the settings used, the selection of which lyrics and melodies to choose, and the final putting together of everything.

Last year, I was involved in several discussions about the potential challenges of using AI in music-making. I also wrote a blog post about some of the possibilities. While in theory AI can be used autonomously I believe that the most interesting is the meeting point between humans and machines. Providing artists like Ary with AI-based technologies can lead to exciting new music!

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alexarje

Alexander Refsum Jensenius is a music researcher and research musician living in Oslo, Norway.