New online course: Motion Capture

After two years in the making, I am happy to finally introduce our new online course: Motion Capture: The art of studying human activity.

The course will run on the FutureLearn platform and is for everyone interested in the art of studying human movement. It has been developed by a team of RITMO researchers in close collaboration with the pedagogical team and production staff at LINK – Centre for Learning, Innovation & Academic Development.

Motivation

In the past, we had so few users in the fourMs lab that they could be trained individually. With all the new exciting projects at RITMO and an increasing amount of external users, we realized that it was necessary to have a more structured approach to teaching motion capture to new users.

The idea was to develop an online course that would teach incoming RITMO students, staff, and guests about motion capture basics. After completing the online course, they would move on to hands-on training in the lab. However, once the team started sketching the content of the course, it quickly grew in scope. The result is a six-week online course, a so-called massive open online course (MOOC) that will run on the FutureLearn platform.

People talking in lab
From one of the early workshops with LINK, in which I explain the basics of a motion capture system (Photo: Nina Krogh).

MOOC experience

Developing a MOOC is a major undertaking, but we learned a lot when we developed Music Moves back in 2015-2016. Thousands of people have been introduced to embodied music cognition through that course. In fact, we will run it for the seventh time on 24 January 2022.

Motion capture is only mentioned in passing in Music Moves. Many learners ask for more. Looking around, we haven’t really found any general courses on motion capture. There are many system-specific tutorials and courses, but not any that introduce the basics of motion capture more broadly. As I have written about in the Springer Handbook of Systematic Musicology (open access version), there are many types of motion capture systems. Most people think about the ones where users wear a suit with reflective markers, but this is only one type of motion capture.

From biomechanics to data management

In the new Motion Capture course, we start with teaching the basics of human anatomy and biomechanics. I started using motion capture without that knowledge myself and have later realized that it is better to understand a bit about how the body moves before playing with the technology.

People talking in front of a whiteboard
RITMO lab engineer Kayla Burnim discusses the course structure with Audun Bjerknes and Mirjana Coh from LINK (Photo: Nina Krogh).

The following weeks in the course contain all the information necessary to conduct a motion capture experiment: setting up cameras, calibrating the system, post-processing, and analysis. The focus is on infrared motion capture, but some other sensing technologies are also presented, including accelerometers, muscle sensors, and video analysis. The idea is not to show everything but to give people a good foundation when walking into a motion capture lab.

The last week is dedicated to data management, including documentation, privacy, and legal issues. These are not the most exciting topics if you want to motion capture. But they are necessary if you’re going to research according to today’s regulations.

From idea to course

Making a complete online course is a major undertaking. Having done it twice, I would compare it to writing a textbook. It helps with prior experience and a good team, but it is still a significant team effort.

We worked with UiO’s Centre for Learning, Innovation and Academic Development, LINK, when developing Music Moves, and I also wanted to get them on board for this new project. They helped structure the development into different stages: ideation, development of learning outcomes, production planning, and production. It is tempting to start filming right away, but the result is much better if you plan properly. The last time we made the quizzes and tests last, and this time, I pushed to make them first to know the direction we were heading.

People talking in front of a table
Mikkel Kornberg Skjeflo from LINK explains how the learning experience becomes more engaging by using different learning activities in the course (Photo: Nina Krogh).

Video production

In Music Moves, we did a lot of “talking head” studio recordings, like this one:

It works in bringing over content, but I look uncomfortable and don’t get through the content very well. I find the “dialogue videos” much more engaging:

Looking at the feedback from learners (we have had around 10 000 people in Music Moves over the years!), they also seem to engage more with less polished video material. So for Motion Capture, we decided to avoid “lecture videos”. Instead, we created situations where pairs would talk about a particular topic. We wrote scripts first, but the recordings were spontaneous, making for a much more lively interaction.

The course production coincided with MusicTestLab, an event for testing motion capture in a real-world venue. The team agreed to use this event as a backdrop for the whole course, making for a quote chaotic recording session. Filming an online course in parallel to running an actual experiment that was also streamed live was challenging, but it also gives the learners an authentic look into how we work.

Musicians on stage with motion capture equipment.
Audun Bjerknes and Thea Dahlborg filming a motion capture experiment in the foyer of the Science Library.

Ready for Kick-off

The course will run on FutureLearn from 24 January 2022. In the last months, we have done the final tweaking of the content. Much effort has also been put into ensuring accessibility. All videos have been captioned, images have been labelled, and copyrights have been checked. That is why I compare it to writing a textbook. Writing the content is only part of the process. Similarly, developing a MOOC is not only about writing texts and recording videos. The whole package needs to be in place.

Music Moves has been running since 2016 and is still going strong. I am excited to see how Motion Capture will be received!

New run of Music Moves

I am happy to announce a new run (the 6th) of our free online course Music Moves: Why Does Music Make You Move?. Here is a 1-minute welcome that I recorded for Twitter:

The course starts on Monday (25 January 2021) and will run for six weeks. In the course, you will learn about the psychology of music and movement, and how researchers study music-related movements, with this free online course.

We developed the course 5 years ago, but the content is still valid. I also try to keep it up to date by recording new weekly wrap-ups with interviews with researchers around here at UiO.

I highly recommend joining the course on FutureLearn, that is the only way to get all the content, including videos, articles, quizzes, and, most importantly, the dialogue with other learners. But if you are only interested in watching videos, all of them are available on this UiO page and this YouTube playlist.

Music Moves #4 has started

We have just kicked off the fourth round of Music Moves, the free, online course we have developed at University of Oslo. The course introduces a lot of the core theories, concepts and methodologies that we work with at RITMO. This time around we also have participants from both the MCT master’s programme and the NordicSMC Winter School taking the course as an introduction to further on-campus studies.

To help with running the course, we have recruited Ruby Topping, who is currently an exchange student at University of Oslo. She was a learner in the first round of Music Moves, and it is great to have her onboard as a mentor for the other learners.

Why join the course?

Music is movement. A bold statement, but one that we will explore together in this free online course.

Together we will study music through different types of body movement. This includes everything from the sound-producing keyboard actions of a pianist to the energetic dance moves in a club.

You will learn about the theoretical foundations for what we call embodied music cognition and why body movement is crucial for how we experience the emotional moods in music. We will also explore different research methods used at universities and conservatories. These include advanced motion capture systems and sound analysis methods.

You will be guided by a group of music researchers from the University of Oslo, with musical examples from four professional musicians. The course is rich in high-quality text, images, video, audio and interactive elements.

Join us to learn more about terms such as entrainment and musical metaphors, and why it is difficult to sit still when you experience a good groove.

Music Moves on YouTube

We have been running our free online course Music Moves a couple of times on the FutureLearn platform. The course consists of a number of videos, as well as articles, quizzes, etc., all of which help create a great learning experience for the people that take part.

One great thing about the FutureLearn model (similar to Coursera, etc.) is that they focus on creating a complete course. There are many benefits to such a model, not least to create a virtual student group that interact in a somewhat similar way to campus students. The downside to this, of course, is that the material is not accessible to others when the course is not running.

We spent a lot of time and effort on making all the material for Music Moves, and we see that some of it could also be useful in other contexts. This semester, for example, I am teaching a course called Interactive Music, in which some of the videos on motion capture would be very relevant for  the students.

For that reason we have now decided to upload all the Music Moves videos to YouTube, so that everyone can access them. We still encourage interested people to enroll in the complete course, though. The next run on FutureLearn is scheduled to start in September.

New MOOC: Music Moves

Together with several colleagues, and with great practical and economic support from the University of Oslo, I am happy to announce that we will soon kick off our first free online course (a so-called MOOC) called Music Moves.

Music Moves: Why Does Music Make You Move?

Learn about the psychology of music and movement, and how researchers study music-related movements, with this free online course.

Go to course – starts 1 Feb

About the course

Music is movement. A bold statement, but one that we will explore together in this free online course. Together we will study music through different types of body movement. This includes everything from the sound-producing keyboard actions of a pianist to the energetic dance moves in a club.

You will learn about the theoretical foundations for what we call embodied music cognition and why body movement is crucial for how we experience the emotional moods in music. We will also explore different research methods used at universities and conservatories. These include advanced motion capture systems and sound analysis methods.

You will be guided by a group of music researchers from the University of Oslo, with musical examples from four professional musicians. The course is rich in high-quality text, images, video, audio and interactive elements.

Join us to learn more about terms such as entrainment and musical metaphors, and why it is difficult to sit still when you experience a good groove.

  • FREE online course
  • 3 hours pw
  • Certificates available

Educators

Alexander Refsum Jensenius Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Diana Kayser (Mentor) Diana Kayser (Mentor)

Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen

Kristian Nymoen Kristian Nymoen

Requirements

This course is open to everyone. No technical knowledge of music or dance is required.

Get a personalised, digital and printed certificate

You can buy a Statement of Participation for this course — a personalised certificate in both digital and printed formats — to show that you’ve taken part.

Join the conversation on social media

Use the hashtag #FLmusicmoves to join and contribute to social media conversations about this course.

Go to course – starts 1 Feb