Tag Archives: camera

Testing simple camera and microphone setups for quick interviews

We just started a new run of our free online course Music Moves. Here we have a tradition of recording wrap-up videos every Friday, in which some of the course educators answer questions from the learners. We have recorded these in many different ways over the years, from using high-end cameras and microphones to just using a handheld phone. We have found that using multiple cameras and microphones is just too time-consuming, both in terms of setup and editing. Using only a mobile phone is extremely easy to set up, but we have had challenges with the audibility of the speech. Before recording this semester’s wrapup videos I therefore decided to test out some solutions based on equipment I had lying around:

  • GoPro Hero 7 w/o audio connector
  • Sony RX100 V
  • Zoom Q8
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 8
  • Røde Smartlav+ lavalier microphone
  • DPA Core 4060 lavalier microphone

In the following I will show some of the results of the testing. I decided to skip the Sony camera in this write-up, because it doesn’t have the option of connecting a separate microphone.

Testing various devices in my office.

GoPro Hero 7

The first example is of a GoPro Hero 7 with just the built-in microphone. This worked much better than expected. The audio is quite clear and it is easy to hear what I am saying. The colours of the video are vivid, but the image is compressed quite a bit. The video is very wide-angled, which is super-practical for such an interview setting, although it looks a bit skewed on the edges. But overall this was a positive surprise.

Connecting a Røde Smartlav+ to the GoPro results in a very clean sound. In fact, this could have been a very nice setup, had it not been for some challenges with placing the camera. That is because the audio dongle for the GoPro is (1) bent downwards and (2) this makes it impossible to use the housing needed to put it on a tripod (as can be seen in the picture to the right). This makes it super-clumpsy to use this setup in a real-life situation. I hear rumours about a new audio add-on for new GoPro cameras, and that may be very interesting to check out.

Zoom Q8

My next device is the Zoom Q8. This is actually a sound recorder with a built-in camera, so one would expect that the audio is the main priority. This is also the case. The video is quite noisy, but the sound quality is much better than with the GoPro. Still I find that the microphone picks up quite a bit of the room. This is good for music recordings, but not so good when the focus is on speech quality.

Hooking up a DPA 4060 lavalier microphone to the Zoom Q8 definitely helps. This is a high-quality microphone, and it needs phantom power (which the Zoom Q8 can deliver). As expected, this gives great sound, very loud and clear. The downside is that it requires bringing an extra XLR cable together with the microphone and camera, since the cable of the DPA is too short for such an interview setup. I like the wide-angle of the video, but the quality of the video is not very good.

Samsung Galaxy Note 8

Mobile phones are becoming increasingly powerful, and I also had to try the camera of my Samsung Galaxy Note 8. I have a small Manfrotto mobile phone stand which makes it possible to place it on a tripod at a suitable distance. After recording I realized how much less wide-angle the phone image is than the GoPro and Zoom cameras, leaving my head cut off in the shots. This doesn’t matter for the testing here, however. The first video is using the built-in microphone of the mobile phone. I am very positively surprised about how crisp and clear my voice is coming through here. In fact, it is quite similar to the GoPro. The video quality is also very good, and clearly the best of the three devices being compared here (the Sony camera has much better video, but it was discarded due to the lack of a microphone input).

And, finally, I connected the SmartLav+ lavalier microphone to the Samsung phone. Here the sound is, of course, very similar to the GoPro recordings.

Conclusion

It is not entirely straight forward to conclude from this testing, but here are some of my thoughts after this very rapid and not very systematic testing:

  • Using on-body microphones (lavalier) greatly improves the audibility as compared to using built-in microphones.
  • The DPA 4060 is great, but the the Smartlav+ is more than good enough for interviews.
  • The GoPro could have been a great device for such interviews, had it not been for the skewed image and the clumsiness of the audio adaptor.
  • The Zoom Q8 is the best audio device (as it should!), but its video is too bad, unfortunately.
  • All in all, I think that the easiest and best solution is the Samsung phone with Smartlav+.

Multiple USB webcams working at the same time

After working happily with FW-products for many years, the recent trend of disappearing FW-ports have made me look for USB-based solutions. For hard drives the switch has been easy, and I also recently got my first USB-based sound card. The hardest part has been to figure out how to handle video cameras.

I have been using various Unibrain cameras for years, and have gotten used to the simplicity of being able to hook up multiple cameras to one computer. Last year when I tried hooking up multiple USB-based webcams to a computer (Windows, since they didn’t work on OSX at all), only one could work at a time. I was therefore pleasantly surprised when I found that Logitech’s QuickCam Vision Pro for Mac actually works well on OSX, and you can even have several of them running at the same time (see screenshot)! Now the only problem is the auto-focus and auto-contrast which tend to cause problems in video analysis (particularly when doing background subtraction).