Strings On-Line installation

We presented the installation Strings On-Line at NIME 2020. It was supposed to be a physical installation at the conference to be held in Birmingham, UK.

Due to the corona crisis, the conference went online, and we decided to redesign the proposed physical installation into an online installation instead. The installation ran continuously from 21-25 July last year, and hundreds of people “came by” to interact with it.

I finally got around to edit a short (1-minute) video promo of the installation:

I have also made a short (10-minute) “behind the scenes” mini-documentary about the installation. Here researchers from RITMO, University of Oslo, talk about the setup featuring 6 self-playing guitars, 3 remote-controlled robots, and a 24/7 high-quality, low-latency, audiovisual stream.

We are planning a new installation for the RPPW conference this year. So if you are interested in exploring such an online installation live, please stay tuned.

Documentation of the NIME project at Norwegian Academy of Music

From 2007 to 2011 I had a part-time research position at the Norwegian Academy of Music in a project called New Instruments for Musical Exploration, and with the acronym NIME. This project was also the reason why I ended up organising the NIME conference in Oslo in 2011.

The NIME project focused on creating an environment for musical innovation at the Norwegian Academy of Music, through exploring the design of new physical and electronic instruments. We were three people involved in the project, percussionist/electro-improviser Kjell Tore Innervik, composer Ivar Frounberg, and myself, and we had a great time together in creating and performing with a number of different new instruments.

A slogan for the project was to create instrument “for the many and for the few”. The “for the many” part we approached through the creation of Oslo Laptop Orchestra and Oslo Mobile Orchestra, and the creation of a series of music balls. The “for the few” part was more specifically targeted at creating specific instruments for professional musicians. Some of these were glass instruments, and here we also did some historic and analytic studies that were presented at NIME 2010.

As an artistic research project we were also careful about documenting all the processes we were involved in, and we also ended up creating a final series of video documentaries reflecting on the process and the artistic outcomes. Kjell Tore has written more about all of this on his own web page. Here I would like to mention three short documentaries we created, reflecting on the roles of technologist, performer, and composer in the project. Creating these documentaries was in itself an interesting exercise. As an academic researcher, I am used to writing formal research papers about my findings. However, as artistic researchers in the NIME project, we all felt that a more discussion-based reflection was more suitable. The documentaries are, unfortunately, only in Norwegian, but we hope to be able to include subtitles in English at some point.

Visualisations of a timelapse video

Yesterday, I posted a blog entry on my TimeLapser application, and how it was used to document the working process of the making of the sculpture Hommage til kaffeselskapene by my mother. The final timelapse video looks like this:

Now I have run this timelapse video through my VideoAnalysis application, to see what types of analysis material can come out of such a video.

The average image displays a “summary” of the entire video recording, somehow similar to an “open shutter” in traditional photography. This image allows for seeing what has been moving and what has not been moving throughout the entire sequence.

Average image
Average image 

The motion average image is somehow similar to the average image, but it summarises the motion images through the entire sequence, that is, only the parts of the image that changed.

Motion average image
Motion average image

What I call a motion history image, is the motion average image overlaid only a single frame from the original video. I typically create such motion history images using both the first and last frames of the video, as can be seen below.

Motion history image, based on first video frame
Motion history image, based on first video frame

Motion history image, based on last video frame
Motion history image, based on last video frame

Finally, I have also created both horisontal and vertical motiongrams of the timelapse video. The horisontal motiongram displays the vertical motion, which in this case is how the sculptor moved back and forth when sitting at the table. The edge of the table can be seen as the “stripe” running throughout the image.

Horisontal motiongram, displaying vertical motion
Horisontal motiongram, displaying vertical motion

The vertical motiongram, on the other hand, displays horisontal motion, that is, how the artist moved sideways throughout the process. Here it is very interesting to note the rhythmic swaying pattern, as the sculptor moved back and forth in what seems to be a periodic pattern.

Vertical motiongram, displaying horisontal motion
Vertical motiongram, displaying horisontal motion

I also have some more motion data, which it will be interesting to study in more detail in Matlab.

Sverm video #3

Video artist Lavasir Nordrum hast just posted the third of four short movies created together with the Sverm group. The first short movie was titled Micromovements, and the second was titled Microsounds. This month’s short movie is called Excitation, and is focused on the first half of an even or action. This will be followed by a short movie called Resonance to be released on 1 January.

Sverm video #1

For the last couple of years I have been involved in an artistic research project called Sverm, in which we investigate the artistic potential of bodily micromovements and microsound. We are currently working towards a series of intimate lab performances in the end of November.

As a side-project to the performances, we are also working with video artist Lavasir Nordrum, on the making of four short videos documenting the four main parts of the project: micromovement, microsound, excitation, resonance.

The first of the videos are now ready, focusing on the topic of micromovement, and featuring Kari Anne Vadstensvik Bjerkestrand, Victoria Johnson and myself.