Tag Archives: violin

New publication: Performing the Electric Violin in a Sonic Space

I am happy to announce that a paper I wrote together with Victoria Johnson has just been published in Computer Music Journal. The paper is based on the experiences that Victoria and I gained while working on the piece Transformation for electric violin and live electronics (see video of the piece below).

Citation
A. R. Jensenius and V. Johnson. Performing the electric violin in a sonic space. Computer Music Journal, 36(4):28–39, 2012.

Abstract
This article presents the development of the improvisation piece Transformation for electric violin and live electronics. The aim of the project was to develop an “invisible” technological setup that would allow the performer to move freely on stage while still being in full control of the electronics. The developed system consists of a video-based motion-tracking system, with a camera hanging in the ceiling above the stage. The performer’s motion and position on stage is used to control the playback of sonic fragments from a database of violin sounds, using concatenative synthesis as the sound engine. The setup allows the performer to improvise freely together with the electronic sounds being played back as she moves around the “sonic space.” The system has been stable in rehearsal and performance, and the simplicity of the approach has been inspiring to both the performer and the audience.

PDF
The PDF will be available in the University of Oslo public repository after the 6 month embargo. Until then, it is available through either MIT Press or Project MUSE.

BibTeX entry
@article{Jensenius:2012,
Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum and Johnson, Victoria},
Journal = {Computer Music Journal},
Number = {4},
Pages = {28–39},
Title = {Performing the Electric Violin in a Sonic Space},
Volume = {36},
Year = {2012}}

Video
Video of the piece Transformation.

Sonification of motiongrams

A couple of days ago I presented the paper “Motion-sound Interaction Using Sonification based on Motiongrams” at the ACHI 2012 conference in Valencia, Spain. The paper is actually based on a Jamoma module that I developed more than a year ago, but due to other activities it took a while before I managed to write it up as a paper.

See below for the full paper and video examples.

The Paper

Abstract: The paper presents a method for sonification of human body motion based on motiongrams. Motiongrams show the spatiotemporal development of body motion by plotting average matrices of motion images over time. The resultant visual representation resembles spectrograms, and is treated as such by the new sonifyer module for Jamoma for Max, which turns motiongrams into sound by reading a part of the matrix and passing it on to an oscillator bank. The method is surprisingly simple, and has proven to be useful for analytical applications and in interactive music systems.

Full reference: A. R. Jensenius. Motion-sound interaction using sonification based on motiongrams. In ACHI 2012: The Fifth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions, pages 170–175. IARIA, 2012.

@inproceedings{Jensenius:2012d,
    Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
    Booktitle = {ACHI 2012: The Fifth International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions},
    Pages = {170--175},
    Publisher = {IARIA},
    Title = {Motion-sound Interaction Using Sonification based on Motiongrams},
    Year = {2012}}

Video examples

Video 1: A screencast demonstrating the jmod.sonifyer~ module.

Video 2: Examples of sonification of some basic movement patterns: up-down, sideways, diagonal and circular.

Video 3: One attempt at sonifying the two axes at the same time. Here both horizontal and vertical motiongrams are created from the same video recording, and the sonifications of the two motiongrams have been mapped to the left and right audio channel respectively.

Video 4: Examples of the importance of filtering and thresholding of the motion image for the final sounding result. The recordings were done at high-speed (200 fps) and played back at 25 fps.

Video 5: Sonification of a short violin improvisation (courtesy of Victoria Johnson).

Video 6: Sonification of a piece by a French-Canadian fiddler (courtesy of Erwin Schoonderwaldt).

Video 7: Sonification of free dance to music.

Video 8: Soniperforma: Performing with the sonifyer at Biermannsgården in Oslo on 18 December 2010. The performance was improvised and based on applying only video effects to change the sonic quality.

Transformation on YouTube

Victoria Johnson has posted a video of the performance of our piece Transformation on Youtube:

The video is from Victoria’s final performance as part of her research fellowship in the arts (PhD-equivalent), which happened Monday 28 March 2011 at the Norwegian Academy of Music.

As I wrote earlier this year:

Transformation a piece where we are using video analysis to control sound selection and spatialisation. We have been developing the setup and piece during the last couple of years, and performed variations of the piece at MIC, the Opera house and at the music academy last year.

Concert: Victoria Johnson

Together with Victoria Johnson I have developed the piece Transformation, a piece where we are using video analysis to control sound selection and spatialisation. We have been developing the setup and piece during the last couple of years, and performed variations of the piece at MIC, the Opera house and at the music academy last year.

The piece will be performed again today, Monday 28 March 2011 at 19:00 at the Norwegian Academy of Music. The concert is the final performance of Victoria’s 3 year research fellowship in the arts (PhD-equivalent).