Tag Archives: sound

Music Moves on YouTube

We have been running our free online course Music Moves a couple of times on the FutureLearn platform. The course consists of a number of videos, as well as articles, quizzes, etc., all of which help create a great learning experience for the people that take part.

One great thing about the FutureLearn model (similar to Coursera, etc.) is that they focus on creating a complete course. There are many benefits to such a model, not least to create a virtual student group that interact in a somewhat similar way to campus students. The downside to this, of course, is that the material is not accessible to others when the course is not running.

We spent a lot of time and effort on making all the material for Music Moves, and we see that some of it could also be useful in other contexts. This semester, for example, I am teaching a course called Interactive Music, in which some of the videos on motion capture would be very relevant for  the students.

For that reason we have now decided to upload all the Music Moves videos to YouTube, so that everyone can access them. We still encourage interested people to enroll in the complete course, though. The next run on FutureLearn is scheduled to start in September.

New MOOC: Music Moves

Together with several colleagues, and with great practical and economic support from the University of Oslo, I am happy to announce that we will soon kick off our first free online course (a so-called MOOC) called Music Moves.

Music Moves: Why Does Music Make You Move?

Learn about the psychology of music and movement, and how researchers study music-related movements, with this free online course.

Go to course – starts 1 Feb

About the course

Music is movement. A bold statement, but one that we will explore together in this free online course. Together we will study music through different types of body movement. This includes everything from the sound-producing keyboard actions of a pianist to the energetic dance moves in a club.

You will learn about the theoretical foundations for what we call embodied music cognition and why body movement is crucial for how we experience the emotional moods in music. We will also explore different research methods used at universities and conservatories. These include advanced motion capture systems and sound analysis methods.

You will be guided by a group of music researchers from the University of Oslo, with musical examples from four professional musicians. The course is rich in high-quality text, images, video, audio and interactive elements.

Join us to learn more about terms such as entrainment and musical metaphors, and why it is difficult to sit still when you experience a good groove.

  • FREE online course
  • 3 hours pw
  • Certificates available

Educators

Alexander Refsum Jensenius Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Diana Kayser (Mentor) Diana Kayser (Mentor)

Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen

Kristian Nymoen Kristian Nymoen

Requirements

This course is open to everyone. No technical knowledge of music or dance is required.

Get a personalised, digital and printed certificate

You can buy a Statement of Participation for this course — a personalised certificate in both digital and printed formats — to show that you’ve taken part.

Join the conversation on social media

Use the hashtag #FLmusicmoves to join and contribute to social media conversations about this course.

Go to course – starts 1 Feb

New publication: An Action-Sound Approach to Teaching Interactive Music

action-sound-os2013My paper titled An action–sound approach to teaching interactive music has recently been published by Organised Sound. The paper is based on some of the theoretical ideas on action-sound couplings developed in my PhD, combined with how I designed the course Interactive Music based on such an approach to music technology.

Abstract
The conceptual starting point for an `action-sound approach’ to teaching music technology is the acknowledgment of the couplings that exist in acoustic instruments between sounding objects, sound-producing actions and the resultant sounds themselves. Digital music technologies, on the other hand, are not limited to such natural couplings, but allow for arbitrary new relationships to be created between objects, actions and sounds. The endless possibilities of such virtual action-sound relationships can be exciting and creatively inspiring, but they can also lead to frustration among performers and confusion for audiences. This paper presents the theoretical foundations for an action-sound approach to electronic instrument design and discusses the ways in which this approach has shaped the undergraduate course titled `Interactive Music’ at the University of Oslo. In this course, students start out by exploring various types of acoustic action-sound couplings before moving on to designing, building, performing and evaluating both analogue and digital electronic instruments from an action-sound perspective.

Reference
Jensenius, A. R. (2013). An action–sound approach to teaching interactive music. Organised Sound, 18(2):178–189.

BibTeX

@article{Jensenius:2013b,
 Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
 Journal = {Organised Sound},
 Number = {2},
 Pages = {178--189},
 Title = {An Action--Sound Approach to Teaching Interactive Music},
 Volume = {18},
 Year = {2013}}
 

Analyzing correspondence between sound objects and body motion

acm-tapNew publication:

Title 
Analyzing correspondence between sound objects and body motion

Authors
Kristian Nymoen, Rolf Inge Godøy, Alexander Refsum Jensenius and Jim Tørresen has now been published in ACM Transactions on Applied Perception.

Abstract
Links between music and body motion can be studied through experiments called sound-tracing. One of the main challenges in such research is to develop robust analysis techniques that are able to deal with the multidimensional data that musical sound and body motion present. The article evaluates four different analysis methods applied to an experiment in which participants moved their hands following perceptual features of short sound objects. Motion capture data has been analyzed and correlated with a set of quantitative sound features using four different methods: (a) a pattern recognition classifier, (b) t-tests, (c) Spearman’s ? correlation, and (d) canonical correlation. This article shows how the analysis methods complement each other, and that applying several analysis techniques to the same data set can broaden the knowledge gained from the experiment.

Reference
Nymoen, K., Godøy, R. I., Jensenius, A. R., and Torresen, J. (2013). Analyzing correspondence between sound objects and body motion. ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, 10(2).

BibTeX

@article{Nymoen:2013,
 Author = {Nymoen, Kristian and God{\o}y, Rolf Inge and Jensenius, Alexander Refsum and Torresen, Jim},
 Journal = {ACM Transactions on Applied Perception},
 Number = {2},
 Title = {Analyzing correspondence between sound objects and body motion},
 Volume = {10},
 Year = {2013}}

Performing with the Norwegian Noise Orchestra

Performing with the Norwegian Noise OrchestraYesterday, I performed with the Norwegian Noise Orchestra at Betong in Oslo, at a concert organised by Dans for Voksne. The orchestra is an ad-hoc group of noisy improvisers, and I immediately felt at home. The performance lasted for 12 hours, from noon to midnight, and I performed for two hours in the afternoon.

For the performance I used my Soniperforma patch based on the sonifyer technique and the Jamoma module I developed a couple of years ago (jmod.sonifyer~). The technique is based on creating a motion image from the live camera input (the webcam of my laptop in this case), and use this to draw a motiongram over time, which again is converted to sound through an “inverse FFT” process.

In the performance I experimented with how different types of video filters and effects influenced the sonic output. The end result was, in fact, quite noisy, as it should be at a noise performance.

To document my contribution, I have made a quick and dirty edit of some of the video recordings I did during the performance. Unfortunately, the audio recording of the cameras used does not do justice to the excellent noise in the venue, but it gives an impression of what was going on.