Performing with the Norwegian Noise Orchestra

Performing with the Norwegian Noise OrchestraYesterday, I performed with the Norwegian Noise Orchestra at Betong in Oslo, at a concert organised by Dans for Voksne. The orchestra is an ad-hoc group of noisy improvisers, and I immediately felt at home. The performance lasted for 12 hours, from noon to midnight, and I performed for two hours in the afternoon.

For the performance I used my Soniperforma patch based on the sonifyer technique and the Jamoma module I developed a couple of years ago (jmod.sonifyer~). The technique is based on creating a motion image from the live camera input (the webcam of my laptop in this case), and use this to draw a motiongram over time, which again is converted to sound through an “inverse FFT” process.

In the performance I experimented with how different types of video filters and effects influenced the sonic output. The end result was, in fact, quite noisy, as it should be at a noise performance.

To document my contribution, I have made a quick and dirty edit of some of the video recordings I did during the performance. Unfortunately, the audio recording of the cameras used does not do justice to the excellent noise in the venue, but it gives an impression of what was going on.

Paper #2 at SMC 2012: Noise level in IR mocap systems

Yesterday I presented a paper on motiongrams at the Sound and Music Computing conference in Copenhagen. Today I will present the paper A study of the noise-level in two infrared marker-based motion capture systems. This is a quite nerdy, in-depth study of the noise-level of two of our motion capture systems.

Abstract

With musical applications in mind, this paper reports on the level of noise observed in two commercial infrared marker-based motion capture systems: one high-end (Qualisys) and one affordable (OptiTrack). We have tested how various features (calibration volume, marker size, sampling frequency, etc.) influence the noise level of markers lying still, and fixed to subjects standing still. The conclusion is that the motion observed in humans standing still is usually considerably higher than the noise level of the systems. Dependent on the system and its calibration, however, the signal-to-noise-ratio may in some cases be problematic.

Downloads

  • Full paper [PDF]
  • Poster [PDF]


Reference

Jensenius, A. R., Nymoen, K., Skogstad, S. A., and Voldsund, A. (2012). A study of the noise-level in two infrared marker-based motion capture systems. In Proceedings of the 9th Sound and Music Computing Conference, pages 258–263, Copenhagen.

BibTeX

@inproceedings{Jensenius:2012i,
   Address = {Copenhagen},
   Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum and Nymoen, Kristian and Skogstad, St{\aa}le A. and Voldsund, Arve},
   Booktitle = {Proceedings of the 9th Sound and Music Computing Conference},
   Pages = {258--263},
   Title = {A Study of the Noise-Level in Two Infrared Marker-Based Motion Capture Systems},
   Year = {2012}}