Workshop: Open NIME

This week I led the workshop “Open Research Strategies and Tools in the NIME Community” at NIME 2019 in Porto Alegre, Brazil. We had a very good discussion, which I hope can lead to more developments in the community in the years to come. Below is the material that we wrote for the workshop.

Workshop organisers

  • Alexander Refsum Jensenius, University of Oslo
  • Andrew McPherson, Queen Mary University of London
  • Anna Xambó, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • Dan Overholt, Aalborg University Copenhagen
  • Guillaume Pellerin, IRCAM
  • Ivica Ico Bukvic, Virginia Tech
  • Rebecca Fiebrink, Goldsmiths, University of London
  • Rodrigo Schramm, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul

Workshop description

The development of more openness in research has been in progress for a fairly long time, and has recently received a lot of more political attention through the Plan S initiative, The Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), EU’s Horizon Europe, and so on. The NIME community has been positive to openness since the beginning, but still has not been able to fully explore this within the community. We call for a workshop to discuss how we can move forward in making the NIME community (even) more open throughout all its activities.

The Workshop

The aim of the workshop is to:

  1. Agree on some goals as a community.
  2. Showcase best practice examples as a motivation for others.
  3. Promote existing solutions for NIME researcher’s needs.
  4. Consider developing new solutions, where needed.
  5. Agree on a set of recommendations for future conferences, to be piloted in 2020.

Workshop Programme

TimeTitleResponsible
11:30WelcomeIntroduction of participantsIntroduction to the topicAlexander Refsum Jensenius

11:45Open Publication perspectivesAlexander Refsum JenseniusDan OverholtRodrigo Schramm
12:15Group-based discussion:How can we improve the NIME publication template?Should we think anew about the reviewing process (open review?)Should we open for a “lean publishing” model?How do we handle the international nature of NIME?
12:45Plenary discussion
13:00Lunch Break
14:30Open Research perspectivesGuillaume PellerinAnna XambóAndrew McPhersonIvica Ico Bukvic
15:00Group-based discussion:What are some best practice Open NIME examples?What tools/solutions/systems should be promoted at NIME?Who should do the job?
15:30Final discussion
16:00End of workshop

Background information

The following sections present some more information about the topic, including current state of affairs in the field.

What is Open Research?

There are numerous definitions of what Open Research constitutes. The FOSTER initiative has made a taxonomy, with these overarching branches :

  • Open Access: online, free of cost access to peer reviewed scientific content with limited copyright and licensing restrictions.
  • Open Data: online, free of cost, accessible data that can be used, reused and distributed provided that the data source is attributed.
  • Open Reproducible Research: the act of practicing Open Science and the provision of offering to users free access to experimental elements for research reproduction.
  • Open Science Evaluation: an open assessment of research results, not limited to peer-reviewers, but requiring the community’s contribution.
  • Open Science Policies: best practice guidelines for applying Open Science and achieving its fundamental goals.
  • Open Science Tools: refers to the tools that can assist in the process of delivering and building on Open Science.

Not all of these are equally relevant in the NIME community, while others are missing.

Openness in the NIME Community

The only aspect that has been institutionalized in the NIME community is the conference proceedings repository. This has been publicly available from the start at nime.org, and in later years all publications have also enforced CC-BY-licensing.

Other approaches to openness are also encouraged, and NIME community members are using various types of open platforms and tools (see the appendix for details):

  • Source code repositories
  • Experiment data repositories
  • Music performance repositories
  • MIR-type repositories
  • Hardware repositories

The question is how we can proceed in making the NIME community more open. This includes the conferences themselves, but also other activities in the community. A workshop on making hardware designs openly available was held in connection to NIME 2016 , and the current project proposal may be seen as a natural extension of that discussion.

The Problem with the Term “Open Science”

Many of the initiatives driving the development of more openness in research refer to this as “Open Science”. In a European context this is particularly driven by some of the key players, including the European Union (EU), the European Research Council (ERC), and the European University Association (EUA). Consequently a number of other smaller institutions and individuals are also using the term, often without thinking very much about the wording.

The main problem with using Open Science as a general term, is that it sounds like this is not something for researchers working in the arts and humanities. This was never the intention, of course, but was more the result of the movement developing from the sciences, and it is difficult to change a term when it has gotten some momentum.

NIME is—and is striving to continue to be—an inclusive community of researchers and practitioners coming from a variety of backgrounds. Many people at NIME would not consider that they work (only) in “science”, but would perhaps feel more comfortable under the umbrella “research”. This term can embrace “scientific research”, but also “artistic research” and R & D found outside of academic institutions. Thus using the term “Open Research” fits better for the NIME community than “Open Science”.

Free

The question of freedom is also connected to the that of openness. In the world of software development, one often talks about “free as in Speech” (libre) or “free as in Beer” (gratis). This point also relates to issues connected to licensing, copyright and reuse. Many people in the community are not affiliated with institutions, and receive payment from their work. Open research might have a close connection with open source, open hardware and open patent. This modern context for research and development of new musical technologies are also beyond academia and must be well planned in order to also attract the industry as partners. How can this be balanced with the needs for openness?

FAIR Principles

Another term that is increasingly used in the community is that of the FAIR principles, which stands for Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. It is important to point out that FAIR is not the same as Open. Even though openness is an overarching aim, there is an understanding that privacy matters and copyright issues are preventing general openness of everything. Still the aim is to make data as open as possible, as closed as necessary. By applying the FAIR principles, it is possible to make metadata available so that it is openly known what types of data exist, and how to ask for access, even though the data may have to be closed.

General Repositories

There are various “bucket-based” repositories that may be used, such as:

What is positive about such repositories is that you can store anything of (more or less) any size. The challenge, however, is the lack of specific metadata, specialized tools (such as visualization methods), and a community.

There are also specific solutions, such as Github for code sharing.

As of 2018 a new repository aimed at coupling benefits of the aforesaid “bucket-based” approach with a robust metadata framework, titled COMPEL, has been introduced. It seeks to provide a convergence point to the diverse NIME-related communities and provide a means of linking their research output.

Openness in the Music Technology community

Looking at many other disciplines, the music technology community has embraced open perspectives in many years. A number of the conferences make their archives publicly available, such as:

There are also various types of open repositories and tools, including:

Best Practice Examples

  • CompMusic as a best practice project in the music technology field 
  • COMPEL focuses on the preservation of reproducible interactive art and more specifically interactive music
  • Bela platform

NIME publication: “NIME Prototyping in Teams: A Participatory Approach to Teaching Physical Computing”

The MCT master’s programme has been running for a year now, and everyone involved has learned a lot. In parallel to the development of the programme, and teaching it, we are also running the research project SALTO. Here the idea is to systematically reflect on our educational practice, which again will feed back into better development of the MCT programme.

One outcome of the SALTO project, is a paper that we presented at the NIME conference in Porto Alegre this week:

Xambó, Anna, Sigurd Saue, Alexander Refsum Jensenius, Robin Støckert, and Øyvind Brandtsegg. “NIME Prototyping in Teams: A Participatory Approach to Teaching Physical Computing.” In Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression. Porto Alegre, 2019.

MCT at NIME
Anna Xambó presents the paper “NIME Prototyping in Teams: A Participatory Approach to Teaching Physical Computing” at NIME 2019.

Abstract:

In this paper, we present a workshop of physical computing applied to NIME design based on science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) education. The workshop is designed for master students with multidisciplinary backgrounds. They are encouraged to work in teams from two university campuses remotely connected through a portal space. The components of the workshop are prototyping, music improvisation and reflective practice. We report the results of this course, which show a positive impact on the students on their intention to continue in STEM fields. We also present the challenges and lessons learned on how to improve the teaching and delivery of hybrid technologies in an interdisciplinary context across two locations, with the aim of satisfying both beginners and experts. We conclude with a broader discussion on how these new pedagogical perspectives can improve NIME-related courses.

Nordic Sound and Music Computing Network up and running

I am super excited about our new Nordic Sound and Music Computing Network, which has just started up with funding from the Nordic Research Council.

This network brings together a group of internationally leading sound and music computing researchers from institutions in five Nordic countries: Aalborg University, Aalto University, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, University of Iceland, and University of Oslo. The network covers the field of sound and music from the “soft” to the “hard,” including the arts and humanities, and the social and natural sciences, as well as engineering, and involves a high level of technological competency.

At the University of Oslo we have one open PhD fellowship connected to the network, with application deadline 4 April 2018. We invite PhD proposals that focus on sound/music interaction with periodic/rhythmic human body motion (walking, running, training, etc.). The appointed candidate is expected to carry out observation studies of human body motion in real-life settings, using different types of mobile motion capture systems (full-body suit and individual trackers). Results from the analysis of these observation studies should form the basis for the development of prototype systems for using such periodic/rhythmic motion in musical interaction.

The appointed candidate will benefit from the combined expertise within the NordicSMC network, and is expected to carry out one or more short-term scientific missions to the other partners. At UiO, the candidate will be affiliated with RITMO Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion. This interdisciplinary centre focuses on rhythm as a structuring mechanism for the temporal dimensions of human life. RITMO researchers span the fields of musicology, psychology and informatics, and have access to state-of-the-art facilities in sound/video recording, motion capture, eye tracking, physiological measurements, various types of brain imaging (EEG, fMRI), and rapid prototyping and robotics laboratories.

New Book: “A NIME Reader”

I am happy to announce that Springer has now released a book that I have been co-editing with Michael J. Lyons: “A NIME Reader: Fifteen Years of New Interfaces for Musical Expression“. From the book cover:

What is a musical instrument? What are the musical instruments of the future? This anthology presents thirty papers selected from the fifteen year long history of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME). NIME is a leading music technology conference, and an important venue for researchers and artists to present and discuss their explorations of musical instruments and technologies.

Each of the papers is followed by commentaries written by the original authors and by leading experts. The volume covers important developments in the field, including the earliest reports of instruments like the reacTable, Overtone Violin, Pebblebox, and Plank. There are also numerous papers presenting new development platforms and technologies, as well as critical reflections, theoretical analyses and artistic experiences.

The anthology is intended for newcomers who want to get an overview of recent advances in music technology. The historical traces, meta-discussions and reflections will also be of interest for longtime NIME participants. The book thus serves both as a survey of influential past work and as a starting point for new and exciting future developments.

The ebook (PDF/epub) is a free download for all institutions/libraries affiliated with Springer Link.

New paper: “NIMEhub: Toward a Repository for Sharing and Archiving Instrument Designs”

At NIME we have a large archive of the conference proceedings, but we do not (yet) have a proper repository for instrument designs. For that reason I took part in a workshop on Monday with the aim to lay the groundwork for a new repository:

NIMEhub: Toward a Repository for Sharing and Archiving Instrument Designs [PDF]

This workshop will explore the potential creation of a community database of digital musical instrument (DMI) designs. In other research communities, reproducible research practices are common, including open-source software, open datasets, established evaluation methods and community standards for research practice. NIME could benefit from similar practices, both to share ideas amongst geographically distant researchers and to maintain instrument designs after their first performances. However, the needs of NIME are different from other communities on account of NIME’s reliance on custom hardware designs and the interdependence of technology and arts practice. This half-day workshop will promote a community discussion of the potential benefits and challenges of a DMI repository and plan concrete steps toward its implementation.

Reference
McPherson, A. P., Berdahl, E., Lyons, M. J., Jensenius, A. R., Bukvic, I. I., & Knudsen, A. (2016). NIMEhub: Toward a Repository for Sharing and Archiving Instrument Designs. In Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression. Brisbane.

BibTeX

@inproceedings{mcpherson_nimehub:_2016,
    address = {Brisbane},
    title = {{NIMEhub}: {Toward} a {Repository} for {Sharing} and {Archiving} {Instrument} {Designs}},
    abstract = {This workshop will explore the potential creation of a community database of digital musical instrument (DMI) designs. In other research communities, reproducible research practices are common, including open-source software, open datasets, established evaluation methods and community standards for research practice. NIME could benefit from similar practices, both to share ideas amongst geographically distant researchers and to maintain instrument designs after their first performances. However, the needs of NIME are different from other communities on account of NIME's reliance on custom hardware designs and the interdependence of technology and arts practice. This half-day workshop will promote a community discussion of the potential benefits and challenges of a DMI repository and plan concrete steps toward its implementation.},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the {International} {Conference} on {New} {Interfaces} {For} {Musical} {Expression}},
    author = {McPherson, Andrew P. and Berdahl, Edgar and Lyons, Michael J. and Jensenius, Alexander Refsum and Bukvic, Ivica Ico and Knudsen, Arve},
    year = {2016},
    file = {McPherson_et_al_2016_NIMEhub.pdf:/home/alexarje/Dropbox/Reference/Zotero/McPherson et al/McPherson_et_al_2016_NIMEhub.pdf:application/pdf}
}