NIME publication and performance: Vrengt

My PhD student Cagri Erdem developed a performance together with dancer Katja Henriksen Schia. The piece was first performed together with Qichao Lan and myself during the RITMO opening and also during MusicLab vol. 3. See here for a teaser of the performance:

This week Cagri, Katja and myself performed a version of the piece Vrengt at NIME in Porto Alegre.

We also presented a paper describing the development of the instrument/piece:

Erdem, Cagri, Katja Henriksen Schia, and Alexander Refsum Jensenius. “Vrengt: A Shared Body-Machine Instrument for Music-Dance Performance.” In Proceedings of the International C Onference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression. Porto Alegre, 2019.

Abstract:

This paper describes the process of developing a shared instrument for music–dance performance, with a particular focus on exploring the boundaries between standstill vs motion, and silence vs sound. The piece Vrengt grew from the idea of enabling a true partnership between a musician and a dancer, developing an instrument that would allow for active co-performance. Using a participatory design approach, we worked with sonification as a tool for systematically exploring the dancer’s bodily expressions. The exploration used a “spatiotemporal matrix,” with a particular focus on sonic microinteraction. In the final performance, two Myo armbands were used for capturing muscle activity of the arm and leg of the dancer, together with a wireless headset microphone capturing the sound of breathing. In the paper we reflect on multi-user instrument paradigms, discuss our approach to creating a shared instrument using sonification as a tool for the sound design, and reflect on the performers’ subjective evaluation of the instrument.

New article: “Correspondences Between Music and Involuntary Human Micromotion During Standstill”

I am happy to announce a new journal article coming out of the MICRO project:

Victor E. Gonzalez-Sanchez, Agata Zelechowska and Alexander Refsum Jensenius
Correspondences Between Music and Involuntary Human Micromotion During Standstill
Front. Psychol., 07 August 2018 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01382

Abstract: The relationships between human body motion and music have been the focus of several studies characterizing the correspondence between voluntary motion and various sound features. The study of involuntary movement to music, however, is still scarce. Insight into crucial aspects of music cognition, as well as characterization of the vestibular and sensorimotor systems could be largely improved through a description of the underlying links between music and involuntary movement. This study presents an analysis aimed at quantifying involuntary body motion of a small magnitude (micromotion) during standstill, as well as assessing the correspondences between such micromotion and different sound features of the musical stimuli: pulse clarity, amplitude, and spectral centroid. A total of 71 participants were asked to stand as still as possible for 6 min while being presented with alternating silence and music stimuli: Electronic Dance Music (EDM), Classical Indian music, and Norwegian fiddle music (Telespringar). The motion of each participant’s head was captured with a marker-based, infrared optical system. Differences in instantaneous position data were computed for each participant and the resulting time series were analyzed through cross-correlation to evaluate the delay between motion and musical features. The mean quantity of motion (QoM) was found to be highest across participants during the EDM condition. This musical genre is based on a clear pulse and rhythmic pattern, and it was also shown that pulse clarity was the metric that had the most significant effect in induced vertical motion across conditions. Correspondences were also found between motion and both brightness and loudness, providing some evidence of anticipation and reaction to the music. Overall, the proposed analysis techniques provide quantitative data and metrics on the correspondences between micromotion and music, with the EDM stimulus producing the clearest music-induced motion patterns. The analysis and results from this study are compatible with embodied music cognition and sensorimotor synchronization theories, and provide further evidence of the movement inducing effects of groove-related music features and human response to sound stimuli. Further work with larger data sets, and a wider range of stimuli, is necessary to produce conclusive findings on the subject.

Nordic Sound and Music Computing Network up and running

I am super excited about our new Nordic Sound and Music Computing Network, which has just started up with funding from the Nordic Research Council.

This network brings together a group of internationally leading sound and music computing researchers from institutions in five Nordic countries: Aalborg University, Aalto University, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, University of Iceland, and University of Oslo. The network covers the field of sound and music from the “soft” to the “hard,” including the arts and humanities, and the social and natural sciences, as well as engineering, and involves a high level of technological competency.

At the University of Oslo we have one open PhD fellowship connected to the network, with application deadline 4 April 2018. We invite PhD proposals that focus on sound/music interaction with periodic/rhythmic human body motion (walking, running, training, etc.). The appointed candidate is expected to carry out observation studies of human body motion in real-life settings, using different types of mobile motion capture systems (full-body suit and individual trackers). Results from the analysis of these observation studies should form the basis for the development of prototype systems for using such periodic/rhythmic motion in musical interaction.

The appointed candidate will benefit from the combined expertise within the NordicSMC network, and is expected to carry out one or more short-term scientific missions to the other partners. At UiO, the candidate will be affiliated with RITMO Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion. This interdisciplinary centre focuses on rhythm as a structuring mechanism for the temporal dimensions of human life. RITMO researchers span the fields of musicology, psychology and informatics, and have access to state-of-the-art facilities in sound/video recording, motion capture, eye tracking, physiological measurements, various types of brain imaging (EEG, fMRI), and rapid prototyping and robotics laboratories.

Come work with me! Lots of new positions at University of Oslo

I recently mentioned that I have been busy setting up the new MCT master’s programme. But I have been even more busy with preparing the startup of our new Centre of Excellence RITMO Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion. This is a large undertaking, and a collaboration between researchers from musicology, psychology and informatics. A visual “abstract” of the centre can be seen in the figure to the right.

Now we are recruiting lots of new people for the centre, so please apply or forward to people you think may be interested:

Come study with me! New master’s programme: Music, Communication and Technology

It has been fairly quiet here on the blog recently. One reason for this is that I am spending quite some time on setting up the new Music, Communication and Technology master’s programme. This is an exciting collaborative project with our colleagues at NTNU. The whole thing is focused around network-based communication, and the students will use, learn about, develop and evaluate technologies for musical communication between the two campuses in Oslo and Trondheim.

Interested, apply to become a student!