Tag Archives: motiongram

New publication: Non-Realtime Sonification of Motiongrams

SMC-poster-thumbToday I will present the paper Non-Realtime Sonification of Motiongrams at the Sound and Music Computing Conference (SMC) in Stockholm. The paper is based on a new implementation of my sonomotiongram technique, optimised for non-realtime use. I presented a realtime version of the sonomotiongram technique at ACHI 2012 and a Kinect version, the Kinectofon, at NIME earlier this year. The new paper presents the ImageSonifyer application and a collection of videos showing how it works.

Title
Non-Realtime Sonification of Motiongrams

Links

Abstract
The paper presents a non-realtime implementation of the sonomotiongram method, a method for the sonification of motiongrams. Motiongrams are spatiotemporal displays of motion from video recordings, based on frame-differencing and reduction of the original video recording. The sonomotiongram implementation presented in this paper is based on turning these visual displays of motion into sound using FFT filtering of noise sources. The paper presents the application ImageSonifyer, accompanied by video examples showing the possibilities of the sonomotiongram method for both analytic and creative applications

Reference
Jensenius, A. R. (2013). Non-realtime sonification of motiongrams. In Proceedings of Sound and Music Computing, pages 500–505, Stockholm.

BibTeX

 @inproceedings{Jensenius:2013f,
    Address = {Stockholm},
    Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings of Sound and Music Computing},
    Pages = {500--505},
    Title = {Non-Realtime Sonification of Motiongrams},
    Year = {2013}}

Kinectofon: Performing with shapes in planes

2013-05-28-DSCN7184Yesterday, Ståle presented a paper on mocap filtering at the NIME conference in Daejeon. Today I presented a demo on using Kinect images as input to my sonomotiongram technique.

Title
Kinectofon: Performing with shapes in planes

Links

Abstract
The paper presents the Kinectofon, an instrument for creating sounds through free-hand interaction in a 3D space. The instrument is based on the RGB and depth image streams retrieved from a Microsoft Kinect sensor device. These two image streams are used to create different types of motiongrams, which, again, are used as the source material for a sonification process based on inverse FFT. The instrument is intuitive to play, allowing the performer to create sound by “touching’’ a virtual sound wall.

Reference
Jensenius, A. R. (2013). Kinectofon: Performing with shapes in planes. In Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression, pages 196–197, Daejeon, Korea.

BibTeX

@inproceedings{Jensenius:2013e,
   Address = {Daejeon, Korea},
   Author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
   Booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression},
   Pages = {196--197},
   Title = {Kinectofon: Performing with Shapes in Planes},
   Year = {2013}
}

kinectofon_poster

ImageSonifyer

ImageSonifyer

Earlier this year, before I started as head of department, I was working on a non-realtime implementation of my sonomotiongram technique (a sonomotiongram is a sonic display of motion from a video recording, created by sonifying a motiongram). Now I finally found some time to wrap it up and make it available as an OSX application called ImageSonifyer.  The Max patch is also available, for those that want to look at what is going on.

I am working on a paper that will describe everything in more detail, but the main point can hopefully be understood by looking at some of the videos I have posted in the sonomotiongram playlist on YouTube. In its most basic form, the ImageSonifyer will work more or less like Metasynth, sonifying an image. Here is a basic example showing how an image is sonified by being “played” from left to right.

But my main idea is to use motiongrams as the source material for the sonification. Here is a sonification of the high-speed guitar recordings I have written about earlier, first played at a rate of 10 seconds:

and then played at a rate of 1 second, which is about the original recording speed.

Are you jumping or bouncing?

walslagOne of the most satisfying things of being a researcher, is to see that ideas, theories, methods, software and other things that you come up with, are useful to others. Today I received the master’s thesis of Per Erik Walslag, titled Are you jumping or bouncing? A case-study of jumping and bouncing in classical ballet using the motiongram computer program, in which he has made excellent use of my motiongram technique and my VideoAnalysis software. This thesis was completed at NTNU last year within the program Nordic Master’s in Dance (NoMAds). That master program is in itself a great example of how a group of fairly small departments can come up with an excellent collaborative study program. I was invited to guest lecture at the program back in 2009, and am very happy to see that my lecture inspired some thoughts and ideas in the students.

Performing with the Norwegian Noise Orchestra

Performing with the Norwegian Noise OrchestraYesterday, I performed with the Norwegian Noise Orchestra at Betong in Oslo, at a concert organised by Dans for Voksne. The orchestra is an ad-hoc group of noisy improvisers, and I immediately felt at home. The performance lasted for 12 hours, from noon to midnight, and I performed for two hours in the afternoon.

For the performance I used my Soniperforma patch based on the sonifyer technique and the Jamoma module I developed a couple of years ago (jmod.sonifyer~). The technique is based on creating a motion image from the live camera input (the webcam of my laptop in this case), and use this to draw a motiongram over time, which again is converted to sound through an “inverse FFT” process.

In the performance I experimented with how different types of video filters and effects influenced the sonic output. The end result was, in fact, quite noisy, as it should be at a noise performance.

To document my contribution, I have made a quick and dirty edit of some of the video recordings I did during the performance. Unfortunately, the audio recording of the cameras used does not do justice to the excellent noise in the venue, but it gives an impression of what was going on.