New publication: Sonic Microinteraction in “the Air”

I am happy to announce a new book chapter based on the artistic-scientific research in the Sverm and MICRO projects.

Citation: Jensenius, A. R. (2017). Sonic Microinteraction in “the Air.” In M. Lesaffre, P.-J. Maes, & M. Leman (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Embodied Music Interaction (pp. 431–439). New York: Routledge.
Abstract: This chapter looks at some of the principles involved in developing conceptual methods and technological systems concerning sonic microinteraction, a type of interaction with sounds that is generated by bodily motion at a very small scale. I focus on the conceptualization of interactive systems that can exploit the smallest possible micromotion that people are able to both perceive and produce. It is also important that the interaction that is taking place allow for a recursive element via a feedback loop from the sound produced back to the performer producing it.

New project Funding: MICRO!

sverm2_15_eyes_2_a_head_a_1024I am happy to announce that I have received funding from the Norwegian Research Council’s program Young Research Talents for the project: MICRO – Human Bodily Micromotion in Music Perception and Interaction. This is a 4-year long project and I will be looking for both a PhD and postdoctoral fellow to join the team. The call will be out later this year, but please do not hesitate to contact me right if you are interested.

Here is a short summary of the project:

How and why does music make us move? This has been a highly discussed topic in musicology and music psychology in recent years. Most of the research in the field has so far focused on fairly large-scale motion to music, such as dancing. This project will investigate how music influences what we may call micromotion, such as the tiny motion observed when people try to stand still. Even though such micromotion is barely visible, it can be measured in a motion capture laboratory. This makes it possible to carry out studies of the effects of music on micromotion.

Results of the project will include:

  • knowledge about how music influences human motion at the micro-level
  • a large, open database of micromotion recordings
  • prototype software for using micromotion in interactive music systems

The project is based on the most recent research in musicology, psychology and neuroscience, will build on findings in the Sverm project. Most of the research will be carried out in the music and motion lab at the Department of Musicology, and will be affiliated with the fourMs group.

Let me know if you are interested in joining us!

 

New publication: Microinteraction in Music/Dance Performance

2012-10-26-dsc_0014b-640This week I am participating at the NIME conference (New Interfaces for Musical Expression), organised at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. I am doing some administrative work as chair of the NIME steering committee, and I was  happy to present a paper yesterday:

Title
Microinteraction in Music/Dance Performance

Abstract
This paper presents the scientific-artistic project Sverm, which has focused on the use of micromotion and microsound in artistic practice. Starting from standing still in silence, the artists involved have developed conceptual and experiential knowledge of microactions, microsounds and the possibilities of microinteracting with light and sound.

Links
Paper (PDF)
Project page

BibTeX

@inproceedings{jensenius_microinteraction_2015,
address = {Baton Rouge, LA},
title = {Microinteraction in {Music}/{Dance} {Performance}},
url = {https://nime2015.lsu.edu/proceedings/178/index.html},
abstract = {Abstract: This paper presents the scientific-artistic project Sverm, which has focused on the use of micromotion and microsound in artistic practice. Starting from standing still in silence, the artists involved have developed conceptual and experiential knowledge of microactions, microsounds and the possibilities of microinteracting with light and sound.},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces For Musical Expression},
author = {Jensenius, Alexander Refsum},
year = {2015}
}