New Master’s Programme: Music, Communication & Technology

We are happy to announce that “Music, Communication & Technology” will be the very first joint degree between NTNU and UiO, the two biggest universities in Norway. The programme is now approved by the UiO board and will soon be approved by the NTNU board.

This is a different Master’s programme. Music is at the core, but the scope is larger. The students will be educated as technological humanists, with technical, reflective and aesthetic skills. We believe that the solutions to tomorrow’s societal challenges need to be based on intimate links between technological competence, musical sensibility, humanistic reflection, and a creative sense.

A core feature of the programme is the unique two-campus design. The student group is physically split between Oslo and Trondheim, 500 kilometres apart, but with a high-quality, network-based multimedia connection that allows for discussions, socialising and playing music. As a student you will get hands-on experience with state-of-the-art facilities, including motion capture systems, music production studios, and large loudspeaker arrays. The theoretical components include acoustics, music cognition, machine learning and human-computer interaction.

Music Moves on YouTube

We have been running our free online course Music Moves a couple of times on the FutureLearn platform. The course consists of a number of videos, as well as articles, quizzes, etc., all of which help create a great learning experience for the people that take part.

One great thing about the FutureLearn model (similar to Coursera, etc.) is that they focus on creating a complete course. There are many benefits to such a model, not least to create a virtual student group that interact in a somewhat similar way to campus students. The downside to this, of course, is that the material is not accessible to others when the course is not running.

We spent a lot of time and effort on making all the material for Music Moves, and we see that some of it could also be useful in other contexts. This semester, for example, I am teaching a course called Interactive Music, in which some of the videos on motion capture would be very relevant for  the students.

For that reason we have now decided to upload all the Music Moves videos to YouTube, so that everyone can access them. We still encourage interested people to enroll in the complete course, though. The next run on FutureLearn is scheduled to start in September.

New MOOC: Music Moves

Together with several colleagues, and with great practical and economic support from the University of Oslo, I am happy to announce that we will soon kick off our first free online course (a so-called MOOC) called Music Moves.

Music Moves: Why Does Music Make You Move?

Learn about the psychology of music and movement, and how researchers study music-related movements, with this free online course.

Go to course – starts 1 Feb

About the course

Music is movement. A bold statement, but one that we will explore together in this free online course. Together we will study music through different types of body movement. This includes everything from the sound-producing keyboard actions of a pianist to the energetic dance moves in a club.

You will learn about the theoretical foundations for what we call embodied music cognition and why body movement is crucial for how we experience the emotional moods in music. We will also explore different research methods used at universities and conservatories. These include advanced motion capture systems and sound analysis methods.

You will be guided by a group of music researchers from the University of Oslo, with musical examples from four professional musicians. The course is rich in high-quality text, images, video, audio and interactive elements.

Join us to learn more about terms such as entrainment and musical metaphors, and why it is difficult to sit still when you experience a good groove.

  • FREE online course
  • 3 hours pw
  • Certificates available

Educators

Alexander Refsum Jensenius Alexander Refsum Jensenius

Diana Kayser (Mentor) Diana Kayser (Mentor)

Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen Hans T. Zeiner-Henriksen

Kristian Nymoen Kristian Nymoen

Requirements

This course is open to everyone. No technical knowledge of music or dance is required.

Get a personalised, digital and printed certificate

You can buy a Statement of Participation for this course — a personalised certificate in both digital and printed formats — to show that you’ve taken part.

Join the conversation on social media

Use the hashtag #FLmusicmoves to join and contribute to social media conversations about this course.

Go to course – starts 1 Feb

New department video

As I have mentioned previously, life has been quite hectic over the last year, becoming Head of Department at the same time as getting my second daughter. So my research activities have slowed down considerably, and also the activity on this blog.

When it comes to blogging, I have focused on building up my Head of Department blog (in Norwegian), which I use to comment on things happening in the Department as well as relevant (university) political issues. My longterm plan, though, is also to write some posts about being Head of Department on this English-language blog.

Today I would like to point to our new department video, targeted at recruiting new students:

The video is made by video journalist Camilla Smaadal, who is also responsible for a set of video presentations of our faculty. Most of these are in Norwegian, but we are planning to add English subtitles through YouTube.

The new video is aiming at giving students an impression of all the cool things happening in our Department. There are a lot of new music education programs popping up everywhere these days, so we realise that we need to be more active in promoting the qualities of our university education. This video is one little step towards this goal.

What does it mean that your system is 7-bit, 10-bit or 16-bit?

In music technology we often talk about n-bit systems. For example, the MIDI protocol is based on a 7-bit scheme, many sensor interfaces use 10-bit resolution for their sensor readings, and sound cards typically record in 16-bit, or even 32-bit. But even though we talk about these things every day, I am often surprised by how many people don’t really know what 7-bit actually means, and that a 32-bit system is not “double” as good as a 16-bit system.

I googled around a little, but couldn’t find a plain and easy table explaining the concept, so here it is, a table showing how many values/combinations you can have in systems with various types of bit-rate:

Bits Exponent Calculation # Values
2-bit 2^2 2×2 = 4
3-bit 2^3 2x2x2 = 8
4-bit 2^4 2x2x2x2 = 16
5-bit 2^5 2x2x2x2x2 = 32
6-bit 2^6 2x2x2x2x2x2 = 64
7-bit 2^7 2x2x2x2x2x2x2 = 128
8-bit 2^8 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2 = 256
9-bit 2^9 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2 = 512
10-bit 2^10 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2 = 1024
11-bit 2^11 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2… = 2048
12-bit 2^12 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2… = 4096
16-bit 2^16 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2… = 65 536
24-bit 2^24 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2… = 16 777 216
32-bit 2^32 2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2x2… = 4 294 967 296